This is a preview. Log in to read the full article. Don't have a log-in?

Learn more Request a demo

Chile: Industrial relations

Original and updating authors: Constanza Contreras and Andres Valdes, Baker & McKenzie

Summary

  • Trade unions that meet certain membership requirements have various entitlements, including collective bargaining rights and time off work and special protection from dismissal for their representatives. (See Trade unions)
  • Individual employers are generally required to engage in collective bargaining if requested by a trade union (or a grouping of employees set up for this purpose). (See Collective bargaining and agreements)
  • Employers are prohibited from committing various "unfair labour practices" that breach employees' trade union rights or hinder collective bargaining. (See Unfair labour practices)
  • Employers have no general statutory obligation to inform and/or consult employees, directly or through trade unions or other representatives, on any business or employment matters. (See Informing and consulting employees - general)
  • There is no statutory obligation on employers to inform and/or consult employees, directly or through trade unions or other representatives, about planned redundancies. (See Informing and consulting prior to redundancies)
  • There is no statutory obligation on employers to inform and/or consult employees, directly or through trade unions or other representatives, prior to business transfers. (See Informing and consulting prior to transfers)
  • Industrial action is lawful only as part of "regulated" collective bargaining aimed at reaching a collective contract, and is subject to detailed regulation. (See Industrial action)