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When is a progressive condition a disability?

This report relates to 1 case(s)

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    Mowat-Brown v University of Surrey [2002] IRLR 235 EAT (4 other reports)

    • Adjusting to disability

      Date:
      1 December 2002

      It is the duty of the employer to make reasonable adjustments to the workplace in order that a disabled person can be successfully employed. Failure to do so can result in a claim for discrimination. The problem lies in determining what is a reasonable adjustment, and it is here that the OH professional can make a contribution, By Joan Lewis and Linda Goldman.

    • When is a progressive condition a disability?

      Date:
      1 September 2002

      A recent EAT case has clarified the meaning of progessive conditions under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.

    • Disability discrimination: Progressive condition a disability only if substantial adverse effects likely in the future

      Date:
      15 April 2002

      In Mowat-Brown v University of Surrey, the EAT upholds an employment tribunal's decision that a claimant diagnosed with multiple sclerosis was not disabled within the meaning of the Disability Discrimination Act.

    • Progressive condition claim fails

      Date:
      1 April 2002

      In Mowat-Brown v University of Surrey (10 December 2001), the EAT holds that an applicant who had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis was not a disabled person within the meaning of the statutory definition because he had not established that the condition was likely to have a substantial adverse effect on his ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

A recent EAT case has clarified the meaning of progessive conditions under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.