Dress codes

New and updated

  • In the courts

    Date:
    1 December 2006
    Type:
    Law reports

    This month's round-up of decisions on discrimination from the courts.

  • Under the law outlawing discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief, are company dress codes permissible?

    Type:
    FAQs

  • Conventional appearance rule not discriminatory

    Date:
    1 September 1996
    Type:
    Law reports

    In Smith v Safeway plc (16 February 1996) EOR69A, the Court of Appeal holds that an appearance code which applies a standard of what is conventional applies an even-handed approach between men and women, and not one which is sex discriminatory.

  • Pony-tail rule discriminatory

    Date:
    1 March 1995
    Type:
    Law reports

    In Smith v Safeway plc (9 December 1994) EOR60B, the EAT, by a majority decision, holds that it was unlawfully discriminatory to dismiss a man for having long hair in circumstances in which a woman with long hair would not have been dismissed.

  • Sex discrimination: Suit requirement not discriminatory

    Date:
    1 August 1994
    Type:
    Law reports

    An employer's dress code which required men to wear a suit, but gave women a much wider choice of clothing, did not give rise to any sex discrimination against men. This finding by an industrial tribunal disclosed no error of law, holds the EAT in James v Bank of England.

  • UK remedy precludes EC law claim

    Date:
    1 July 1994
    Type:
    Law reports

    In Blaik v The Post Office (16 November 1993) EOR56D, the EAT rules that a complaint cannot be brought directly under the EEC Equal Treatment Directive where there is a sufficient remedy under the British Sex Discrimination Act 1975.

  • Dress rule not discriminatory

    Date:
    1 March 1994
    Type:
    Law reports

    In Burrett v West Birmingham Health Authority (8 October 1993) EOR54D, the EAT rules that a female nurse was not treated less favourably by being required to wear a nurse's cap which she found demeaning, even though male nurses were not required to wear a cap.

About this topic

HR and legal information and guidance relating to employee dress codes.