Special employee categories

Clio Springer

Editor's message: Employers need to pay particular attention to specific employee categories when recruiting new staff and take care to comply with equality requirements as well as the law concerning atypical workers such as agency workers and part-time and fixed-term employees.

Employers also need to be aware of the legislative framework in relation to other special employee categories, as part of their recruitment processes, including around job applicants with convictions and employing foreign nationals and young people and children.

In relation to job applicants with a disability, employers must comply with the duty to make reasonable adjustments during the recruitment process.

Clio Springer, senior employment law editor

Latest items in Special employee categories

  • Podcast: October 2016 and beyond

    Date:
    30 September 2016
    Type:
    Audio and video

    We discuss the key legal developments affecting employers from October 2016 and beyond, including: changes to the national minimum wage rates; reforms to employment tribunals; public-sector exit payments and important case decisions to look out for.

  • Date:
    20 September 2016
    Type:
    Legal guidance

    An employer that discovers that an employee no longer has the right to work in the UK, or that immigration permission is due to expire, needs to take action to avoid criminal and civil penalties.

  • Podcast: Employees who no longer have the right to work in the UK

    Date:
    16 September 2016
    Type:
    Audio and video

    We discuss how employers should deal with a situation in which an employee no longer has the right to work in the UK.

  • Podcast: Dealing with an employee who no longer has the right to work in the UK

    Date:
    16 September 2016
    Type:
    Editor's choice

    We discuss how employers should deal with the situation when an employee no longer has the right to work in the UK, while complying with their employment law obligations.

  • Date:
    15 September 2016
    Type:
    Legal guidance

    The autumn months promise to be a busy period for HR practitioners as they get to grips with a host of employment law changes. Bar Huberman sets out the top 10 upcoming legislative changes that employers need to be ready for, even though many implementation dates have yet to be confirmed.

  • How employers can break the re-offending cycle

    Date:
    13 September 2016
    Type:
    Commentary and analysis

    Young entrepreneur Jacob Hill has just launched Offploy, which guides businesses through the HR, legal and ethical minefield associated with ex-offender employment. He considers the role that employers can play in rehabilitation and the challenges that need to be overcome to give ex-offenders a second chance.

  • Hermes could be subject to HMRC investigation

    Date:
    13 September 2016
    Type:
    News

    Business minister Margot James has asked HMRC to consider launching an investigation into pay and employment practices at courier company Hermes.

  • Employees who no longer have the right to work in the UK

    Date:
    8 September 2016
    Type:
    Editor's choice

    This new "how to" guide provides practical guidance on dealing with the situation in which an employee no longer has the right to work in the UK, while complying with employment law obligations.

  • Date:
    6 September 2016
    Type:
    Legal guidance

    As Theresa May rejects the idea of a points-based immigration scheme for EU workers, employers continue to face uncertainty as to the long-term impact of the Brexit vote on UK employment laws. We provide a practical checklist to help employers prepare for the UK's departure from the EU.

  • How to deal with an employee who no longer has the right to work in the UK

    Type:
    How to

    Practical guidance on dealing with the situation in which an employee no longer has the right to work in the UK, including guidance on avoiding illegal working, fair dismissal, the 28-day grace period and the Home Office employer checking service.