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Ireland: Industrial relations

Original and updating author: Mark Carley

Consultant editor: Lauren Tennyson

Summary

  • Although the constitution establishes a right for workers to join a trade union, it does not oblige employers to recognise a union for collective bargaining purposes. (See Trade union recognition)
  • Collective agreements are not enforceable in law unless registered, and their terms are generally incorporated into individual contracts of employment. (See Collective agreements)
  • Employees in undertakings with at least 50 employees have a general right to information and consultation from their employer. (See Informing and consulting employees - general)
  • There are various rules regarding employers' obligations to inform and consult prior to redundancies. (See Informing and consulting prior to redundancies)
  • There are various rules regarding employers' obligations to inform and consult prior to business transfers. (See Informing and consulting prior to transfers)
  • "Community-scale" undertakings must, in certain circumstances, establish a body to negotiate with management over the establishment of a European Works Council or an information and consultation procedure. (See European Works Councils)
  • Trade unions do not have a right to strike, but are given immunity from certain things in relation to acts done in contemplation or furtherance of a trade dispute. (See Industrial action and picketing)