Topics

Recruitment

Noelle MurphyEditor's message: Its employees are any organisation's most valuable asset. With the availability of workers to fill vacancies in decline, finding candidates with the right skill set is often difficult, and good candidates are increasingly able to pick and choose between job offers. An effective recruitment process, providing a positive recruitment experience for candidates, is likely to have a substantial impact on their perception of your organisation as an employer - helping you to fill vacancies more quickly and effectively, and, most importantly, with the right person for the role.

With line managers increasingly participating in the recruitment process, it is vital that everyone involved has the relevant skills and knowledge. In particular, anyone taking part in activities such as shortlisting and interviewing should be aware of the relevant discrimination legislation. Equal opportunities and diversity need to be considered at each point in the process, with regular reviews carried out to ensure that there is no hidden bias and that candidates are being judged fairly on their merits.

Noelle Murphy, senior HR practice editor

New and updated

  • Coming soon to XpertHR

    Type:
    Editor's choice

    Updated to include information on the forthcoming How to support a bereaved employee.

  • Future skills framework to be developed

    Date:
    15 August 2019
    Type:
    News

    A framework for "essential" skills - such as teamwork, presenting and problem-solving - will be developed by a new task force to help inform employers' future hiring criteria and plans for progression.

  • Employing foreign nationals

    Type:
    Employment law manual

    Updated to include a reference to the Government's announcement about a proposed fast-track immigration route for scientists and researchers.

  • Date:
    9 August 2019
    Type:
    Legal guidance

    The Government has announced significant reforms to the law on spent convictions and rehabilitation periods. If the proposals go ahead, fewer convictions will have to be revealed to employers and there will be more cases in which they will be unable to refuse employment because of a job applicant's past convictions.

  • Recruitment

    Type:
    Indicators

    Updated to include data for July 2019 on the availability and recruitment of permanent and temporary staff from IHS Markit/KPMG/Recruitment & Employment Confederation. The next figures are due to be published on 6 September 2019.

  • Date:
    26 July 2019
    Type:
    Legal guidance

    July 2019 saw progress made on an unusual number of proposed employment law changes. The Government published consultations covering workplace sexual harassment, statutory sick pay, family-friendly leave and pay, flexibility in working hours, modern slavery statements, and enforcement of worker rights. It also made announcements on changes to the laws on rehabilitation periods for offenders, settlement agreements, and protection against redundancy during pregnancy and maternity leave.

  • How recruitment technology can help boost social mobility

    Date:
    25 July 2019
    Type:
    Commentary and analysis

    The causes of poor social mobility are deep-rooted and complex, but that doesn't mean employers can't do more to attract a diverse talent pool. Jodie Grove explains how technology can break down some of the barriers preventing candidates from applying for certain roles.

  • Recruiting graduates and apprentices survey 2019/2020

    Date:
    24 July 2019
    Type:
    Survey analysis

    XpertHR research provides insights on the recruitment and reward of graduates and apprentices in 2019/2020.

  • Recruiting people to work with children and/or vulnerable adults policy

    Type:
    Policies and documents

    Updated to include information about proposed reforms to the rules on rehabilitation periods.

  • Job applicants with convictions

    Type:
    Employment law manual

    Updated to include information about proposed reforms to the rules on rehabilitation periods.